Communication Studies

COMM-C 104 Voice and Diction (3 cr.)   Directed primarily toward the improvement of normal speech patterns, with emphasis on normal production, resonation, and articulation.

COMM-C 180 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.)   The study of human dyadic interaction, including topics such as perception processes, verbal/nonverbal communication, theoretical models of communication, conflict, and interpersonal communication in various relationships. Course covers applications of interpersonal communication theory/research, including communication competence. PUL=5

COMM-C 223 Business and Professional Communication (3 cr.)   Preparation and presentation of interviews, speeches, and oral reports appropriate to business and professional organizations; group discussion and parliamentary procedure. This is an intermediate skills course with survey characteristics. PUL=1A

COMM-C 228 Discussion and Group Methods (3 cr.)   Theory of and practice in effective participation in and leadership of group, committee, conference, and public discussion; application to information-sharing and problem-solving situations.

COMM-C 322 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.)   P: C180 or permission of instructor. Covers core components of the study of interpersonal communication: perception, systems, exchange theoretical approaches; methods of research in interpersonal communication; content (topic) areas such as intimate relationships and friendships. Includes applications of interpersonal communication theory/research.

COMM-C 322 Interviewing Principles and Practices (3 cr.)  [P:COMM-R110 or equivalent.]   Emphasizes verbal and nonverbal communication in pre-interview back-ground research preparation, interview schedule design, question construction, and post-interview self-analysis in several interviewing contexts. Course includes significant assignments designed to help the student enhance oral performance competencies.

COMM-C 380 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.)   The application of communication theory and research to the study of communication in various types of organizations. Explores reciprocal influence between communication and organizational structures and between communication and managerial styles. Discusses communication designs, superior/subordinate communication, conflict, information management, networks, communication vis-a-vis employee motivation, satisfaction, and productivity; and communication effectiveness in organizations.

COMM-C 393 Family Communication (3 cr.)  [P:C180 or permission of instructor.]   Theory/research on the role of communication in creating and maintaining marriages and families. Topics include communication and family life cycles, different family forms, family race/ethnicity, power, and conflict. Covers application of family communication theory/research.

COMM-C 482 Intercultural Communication (3 cr.)  [P:Comm C180 or permission of instructor.]   Cognitive, affective, and behavioral learning about intercultural and intracultural communication to increase understanding of the centrality of communication in the social. psychological, and environmental aspects of culture.

COMM-G 100 Introduction to Communication Studies (3 cr.)  [P:Reading placement of at least 80 and placement in Eng W131.]   Survey course of history, theory, and practice in each of six major areas: rhetoric and public address, theatre arts, interpersonal/ organizational communication, small group dynamics, public communication, and mass media studies. For each of the areas examined, students will apply theory to practice, thereby learning to become more effective communicators. PUL=1A

COMM-G 201 Introduction to Communication Studies (3 cr.)   A survey of theories in the field of human communication. Consideration is given to theories that explain communication behavior between pairs of people, within groups, in organization, and in societies.

COMM-G 300 Independent Study (1-8 cr.)   Research or practical experience in various departmental areas as selected by the student prior to registration, outlined in consultation with the instructor, and approved by the department. If a practicum experience, it must represent a minimum of 45 clock hours of practical application per credit hour. A student shall take no more than a total of 9 credit hours of G300 and G491. PUL=4

COMM-G 310 Introduction to Communication Research (3 cr.)   Methodologies and types of data analyses for investigating communication phenomena. Students will acquire knowledge and competencies that will allow them to understand and address the process of communication research and relevant communication research issues. PUL=1B

COMM-G 391 Seminar (1-3 cr.)   P: permission of instructor. Topic announced in prior semester; oriented to current topics in communication and theatre; readings, projects, and papers as indicated by the topic and instructor. May be repeated for a total of 8 credit hours.

COMM-M 150 Mass Media and Contemporary Society (3 cr.)   A critical overview of the role of electronic mass media in contemporary society. Provides an introduction to such issues as industry structure, organization, and economics; regulation, public interest, and media ethics; impact of programming on individuals; media construction of social institutions; media issues in the global village. PUL=2

COMM-R 110 Fundamentals of Speech Communication (3 cr.)   Theory and practice of public speaking; training in thought processes necessary to organize speech content for informative and persuasive situations; application of language and delivery skills to specific audiences. A minimum of six speaking situations. PUL=1A

COMM-R 227 Argumentation and Debate (3 cr.)   Analysis, evidence, and argument in logical discourse; study of debate forms; practice in argumentative speaking in class, campus, and intercollegiate debate. PUL=2

COMM-R 309 Great Speakers: American Public Address (3 cr.)   Course introduces students to historical and contemporary public address. Students will study the speechmaking of notable American speakers. The study will include speeches from a wide range of established genres and will include campaign rhetoric, debates, historical celebrations, lectures, legislative speaking, presidential speaking, public meetings, movement, rhetoric, and sermons.

COMM-R 310 Rhetoric and Public Address (3 cr.)   P: R110 or equivalent. Development of theory of oral discourse; the influence of public address; historical and current problems in rhetoric of conflict, in freedom of speech, and in propaganda and persuasion. PUL=5

COMM-R 320 Advanced Public Communication (3 cr.)   P: R110 or equivalent. Development of a marked degree of skill in preparation and delivery of various types of speeches, with emphasis on depth of research, clarity of organization, application of proof, and felicitous style.

COMM-R 321 Persuasion (3 cr.)   P: R110 or equivalent. Motivational appeals in influencing behavior; psychological factors in speaker-audience relation-ship; principles and practice of persuasive speaking.

COMM-R 330 Communication Criticism (3 cr.)   P: G100 or R110 and reading placement of at least 80. Course will introduce students to criticism as a method of studying persuasive messages in speeches, fiction, mass media, music, political campaigns, art, and other modes of communication in contemporary culture. PUL=5

COMM-R 390 Political Communication (3 cr.)   Provides an opportunity to study, understand, and participate in political communication. Topics covered include the rhetoric of politics, campaign discourse, political advertising, the role of the media and public opinion, the impact of new technology, and the place of interpersonal communication. PUL=5

COMM-T 337 History of the Theatre I (3 cr.)   Significant factors in primary periods of theatre history through the Renaissance and the effect on contemporary theatre; emphasis on trends and developments; review of representative plays of each period to illustrate the theatrical use of dramatic literature.

COMM-T 337 History of the Theatre I (3 cr.)   Significant factors in primary periods of theatre history through the Renaissance and the effect on contemporary theatre; emphasis on trends and developments; review of representative plays of each period to illustrate the theatrical use of dramatic literature.