Information

To learn more about the Indiana University Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Sociology degree, a minor in medical sociology, or a minor in women’s studies, please contact:

  • Aimee Zoeller
    Lecturer, Sociology
    Office: CC Room 235
    Phone: 812.348.7330
    E-mail: anzoelle@iupuc.edu
  
Professional Organizations

Consider joining a professional organization dedicated to sociology or social issues. Many have special rates for college students! Suggestions include:

  

Sociology

Sociology is the scientific study of society and human interaction. As a student in the Indiana University Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Sociology program at IUPUC, you will explore the interaction between individual and groups of humans who live, learn, work, and play in societies.

You can earn your sociology degree at IUPUC and seek employment in a wide variety of occupations across diverse sectors such as business, health professions, criminal justice system, social services, and government. You may work as a child welfare advocate, criminologist, law enforcement and corrections officers, counselor, therapist, or non-profit director.  A degree in sociology is highly adaptable to many career paths. The skills you will learn as a sociology researcher and writer will translate to many jobs.

Human beings are social animals. We live in groups and do most things with other people. Much of what we think, say, and do is influenced by what others expect of us and by how others treat us.

Sociologists study the patterns of interaction between people in all sorts of settings: at work, at play, at home. They try to clarify what behavior is happening, what lies behind it, what is likely to come from it, and what might be done differently. Their theories and research findings can provide insights into processes and events that affect us in our everyday lives.

Some families are very close and loving, while others are dysfunctional and mired in problems. Some teens and adults get involved in criminal careers while others avoid breaking the law. Some companies are much more productive than others. Some government programs succeed while others fail—these are all examples of the kinds of issues sociologists systematically explore.

Working with our faculty advisors, you can tailor your sociology studies to fit your unique educational and career goals. You’ll have opportunities to learn about important social issues like crime, poverty, race relations, politics, family interaction, gender and sexuality, religion, and education and how they impact human behavior and quality of life experiences.

To get a better feel for whether a degree or minor in sociology is right for you, please review these course descriptions.

Minor in Sociology

  • To declare a minor in sociology, review the course requirements and complete the application form and return to Natalie Edwards.
  • The form should be completed and submitted when you are enrolled in your final sociology class but before you graduate.

Career Options

Sociology offers a unique perspective and practical skills for working in today’s increasingly complex and global society. Students who graduate with a degree in sociology often find that they have unique analytical and research skills which make them competitive for a wide variety positions in today’s job market.

A degree in sociology will provide you with excellent preparation for careers in social services, law, criminal justice, health care, business, and industry.  A few examples include:

  • Human resources, consumer relations, labor relations, and training and development
  • Real estate or insurance agent
  • Marketing analyst, merchandiser, purchasing officer, or sales executive
  • Case manager working with children, teens, adults, the elderly, and families
  • Hospital, nursing home, or group home administrator
  • Career or admissions counselor, fundraising associate, or alumni relations coordinator at a college or university
  • Affirmative action officer, human rights officer, international aid worker
  • Probation officer, correctional counselor, juvenile court worker, police officer
  • Demographic specialist, statistician, or consumer researcher

Read more about careers for sociology majors in 21st Century Careers with an Undergraduate Degree in Sociology, a publication of the American Sociological Association.